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  • Writer's pictureJuliana Pinté

It is not what you see: but how you read it

Updated: Feb 2, 2023

No one needs a book or an audio guide to experience the beauty of a painting.

We are moved by a smile, dazzled by a colour, impressed by a subject.

You like or you don't like a painting... But once the emotion has passed, questions arise and it is then that we need some explanations, and nothing is better that a quality tour guide, who understands you, giving you space to appreciate Art, and close enough to answer your interrogations and lead you to the uncharted territories of Art.

Sfumato technique on a Renaissance Painting

Isn't it more interesting to know the technique of Sfumato ("Blurring smoke") in order to appreciate the mysterious sweetness of the Mona Lisa's smile; to realize that if the portraits multiply in the XVI ° century it is partly because, at this time of humanism, one discovers the importance of the individual?


Isn't it better to know the symbolism of a carnation, a mirror or a mandora better in order to decipher Baugin's Still Life?


Painting of Baugin at the Louvre - Nature morte à l'échiquier
Baugin - Nature morte à l'échiquier

The questions do not come by themselves, of course, but as soon as you have certain notions they are linked quickly and the answers follow naturally.


Thus, adding a private guided tour in the Louvre will be more than enough to acquire the essential notions and appreciate paintings in all their diversity.


It is this principle which guided us in the conception of this work. Here is how it is articulated. In the introduction, a few minutes are devoted to the museum itself, its history and the history of the collections.


The paintings chosen are then carefully studied: explanation of the subject represented, analysis of the techniques used, evocation of the historical context.


Punctuating these analyses, six hats are devoted to the genres to which these works are attached and to their evolution. At the end of the Louvre Guided tour, a quality tour usually provides some essential details and tips for Paris.


The truth of life is not always pretty, Art, however, can reflect and challenge our perceptions of the truth.

In order to be art, the reflection of truth must be beautiful.


Artistic truth, then, must be a reflection of what is true, but not necessarily what is accepted as beautiful. In the Western tradition, beauty is often equated with goodness. This aesthetic assumption is not universal, however. Many cultures and traditions around the world have a different understanding of beauty. What is beautiful to one person may not be beautiful to another.


Even within a particular cultural context, beauty is often in the eye of the beholder. In the realm of public discourse, however, these aesthetic assumptions often go unquestioned.

As a result, they shape and constrain our collective understanding of beauty.


Beauty, in the public imagination, is often associated with positive moral values. Beauty is often associated with goodness. Art has the power to convey truth and beauty in ways that a strictly non-fiction account of the same facts cannot achieve. There is a reason that the word “poetry” comes from a form of art. A good piece of art has the power to move people and change their viewpoint on a topic. Art has the ability to convey truth in ways that facts cannot. Facts are cold, unyielding, and often uninteresting. Truth is the bedrock of any relationship. When you build your relationship on truth, you can trust each other. When you can trust each other, you can be yourselves around each other. When you are yourselves around each other, you can be vulnerable. When you are vulnerable, you open the door to the deepest and richest intimacy.


Moral Values in Art has evolved through history.

From being symbolic and religious to being realistic and socially conscious, the scope of art has changed with the times. Artists have always been at the forefront of social change, challenging the norms of their time.


This can be seen in the works of Da Vinci during High Renaissance or even in the works of ancient Greek and Roman artists, who were the first to depict art with so much realism and details.


Louvre - Mona Lisa - Da Vinci



Themes like unity, prosperity, love, and spirituality are common in all genres of art, but the way they are expressed changes with the times. Art can reflect the moral values of a society at a particular point in time or can also challenge these values with pieces that are considered to be ‘provocative’.


Angel  painting- 14th century by Italian Painter
Angel - 14th century by Italian Painter

Western Art was religious and private for Royalty and actually started with the aim to please the Gods, the church, the priest to be more accurate and then to please the King, the court, or his consultants to be more accurate.


Later, it served to educate the public. Finally, it became the voice of the people and the reflection of their moral values. Art has always been a reflection of the society around it. Through its various genres and themes, it has communicated the moral values of the people living in that particular time. From cave paintings to modern art, each form of art has served to reflect the moral values of its time.


Visiting an art gallery in Paris or a national museum with your family can be an overwhelming but also an interesting outing.


Explore and appreciate different kinds of art with your kids during a shared moment of learning and pleasure is a cherished memory for many travellers to Paris.

Visual art is not just about paintings but also includes drawings, sculptures, photography, museology and even a youtube video.


If you are planning a trip to a museum or an art gallery with your family soon, here are some ideas to help you understand the history of visual arts better.


Visiting a national museum such as Museum d'orsay or the Louvre can be an exciting experience for the beloved ones. There are so many different types of art that it’s difficult to know where to start when visiting Paris, the great art city.


Different types of art

The visual arts include paintings, drawings, sculptures, photography, installations, film, video, and many other artistic disciplines. There are hundreds of different types of art and it can be challenging to know where to start when visiting an art gallery. The good news is that you don’t have to try to understand everything in one visit. There are many different sub-categories of visual art: - Painting - This includes oil painting, watercolor, gouache, tempera, acrylic, oils, pastel, and many other types. - Drawing - This includes sketches, charcoal drawings, ink drawings, pencil drawings, and many other types. - Sculpture - This includes stone and marble sculptures, clay sculptures, metal sculptures, and many other types. - Installation - This is a type of art that uses architecture, sound, light, and other materials to produce an overall effect. - Film and video - This involves the production of moving images and sound that is projected or recorded on a screen.


King Dasaratha and His Retinue Proceed to Rama's Wedding
King Dasaratha and His Retinue Proceed to Rama's Wedding


What to look at when you visit an art museum or gallery?

When visiting an art museum or gallery, it’s important to remember that you don’t need to try to understand everything at once. It can be challenging to understand the different types of art when visiting an art gallery, but remember that you don’t need to understand everything at once. Even if you don’t understand a particular piece of art, there is still so much more to be discovered! The best way to approach a visit to an art gallery or museum is to start with one piece of art at a time and then move on to another piece. You can read the information on the wall to find out more about the piece or artist, and then you can ask the kids what they think about the artwork. The kids will learn so much more if they have a chance to explore the artwork themselves instead of just listening to what you have to say.


How to understand different types of art?

Art can be challenging to understand, but there are some ways that can help you get more out of your visit to an art gallery or museum.


- Take some time to fully absorb the artwork: The easiest way to understand the artwork is to simply observe it. It’s important to look into the context of the artwork as a whole and see how different elements of its history, political context, religious messages, such as symbols, subjects, animals to the small details such as colors, texture, or form come together to create the whole piece.

- Ask questions to the guide: Sometimes asking a few questions can help you to understand the artwork better. Start off by asking about the Artist's life and why the artist created this piece in particular

Then ask what is new with the artist: did he/she made a rupture with old techniques? is he fighting a system or a belief?

- Look at the museum information: Most pieces of art are titled and annoted by the museum so that viewers can understand the artwork better. The title will usually explain the subject matter or concept behind the artwork.

- Ask the curator or gallery guide: Curators and gallery guides often have a lot of knowledge about the artwork. You can ask them questions about the artwork, and they will be able to tell you what you need to know.



The history of visual arts: From Antiquity to the Renaissance

Art has been a unique part of human culture for thousands of years. The earliest known art dates back to the cave painting of the Neolithic Period, beginning around 30,000 BCE.

Photography of Lascaux animal painting - Neolithic Period

The first artists are believed to have been hunters and gatherers who created paintings on cave walls. Art remained a relatively minor part of human culture until the rise of the Classical civilizations in the Mediterranean and Asia. The Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans all created art, but it was largely used to glorify their rulers. The art of the ancient civilizations was predominantly two-dimensional. It was created on walls, pottery, and other objects. The focus was mostly on realism, with a special emphasis on accurately depicting nature. The Romans were especially keen on realism. The artists of the classical civilizations also focused on realism, but they also used perspective to create the illusion of depth.


The Renaissance: From Medieval to Modern Art

The Renaissance period was a time of change and innovation. Artists began to value creativity and imagination, and they moved away from the strict rules of the past. They started to use different artistic techniques and materials, and art became more about self-expression than accurately depicting nature. The Renaissance also saw an explosion of art in other fields as well. Architecture, literature, and science also underwent major changes during this period. The Renaissance also saw a shift in focus from the clergy to the nobility. Wealthy nobles began to commission art for their homes. Art was no longer just for religious purposes such as church decorations and stained glass windows.


visit with Julie P in the Louvre - Painting of Wedding in Cana
visit with Julie P in the Louvre - Painting of Wedding in Cana


From the 18th century to today’s world

Art continued to evolve from the 19th century onward. The Industrial Revolution in the late 18th and 19th centuries had a major impact on the creation of art. New machines made it possible to mass-produce artwork, which led to less creativity and a greater focus on realism. Photography was also invented during this period, and it changed the way that people viewed art.


The Crystal Palace housed the Great Exhibition of 1851.
The Crystal Palace housed the Great Exhibition of 1851.

The invention of photography meant that people no longer needed to create art to see their world. They could simply take a picture and keep it as a memory. As a result, painting and other types of artwork became less popular. Painting was viewed as an expensive hobby, while photography was much less expensive. The art world was transformed again in the 20th century. The two world wars had a major impact on the world, and they greatly influenced the art created during this period. The two wars also changed the way that people viewed art. Modern art is characterized by a rejection of traditional approaches and techniques, and an emphasis on expressing the artist’s creativity and imagination.


Art has been a part of human culture for thousands of years.

The earliest known art dates back to the Neolithic Period, beginning around 30,000 BCE. The first artists are believed to have been hunters and gatherers who created paintings on cave walls. The art of the ancient civilizations was predominantly two-dimensional. It was created on walls, pottery, and other objects.


The focus was mostly on realism, with a special emphasis on accurately depicting nature. The Renaissance period was a time of change and innovation. Artists began to value creativity and imagination, and they moved away from the strict rules of the past. They started to use different artistic techniques and materials, and art became more about self-expression than accurately depicting nature. From the 18th century onward, art continued to evolve. The Industrial Revolution in the late 18th and 19th centuries had a major impact on the creation of art. New machines made it possible to mass-produce artwork, which led to less creativity and a greater focus on realism.


Photography was also invented during this period, and it changed the way that people viewed art. The invention of photography meant that people no longer needed to create art to see their world. They could simply take a picture and keep it as a memory. As a result, painting and other types of artwork became less popular.


Today, YouTube is considered as a visual art.

It has been an unbelievable way for people to express themselves through short videos. The platform is not only for entertainers, but for many people all over the world, it helped them gain more confidence, inspire new hobbies and interests, and even connect to new friends.


5 Days in Paris to See the Best Art Museums

Perhaps no other city in the world is as synonymous with art and art museums as Paris. The City of Lights boasts some of the world’s most famous museums. Whether you’re an art lover or a first-time visitor to Paris, it’s worth planning your trip to take in some of the best art museums the city has to offer. If you’re only able to spend a short time in Paris, it might seem challenging to fit in visits to all of its many museums. However, rest assured there are plenty of opportunities for visitors interested in art and culture. Even though there are numerous smaller museums throughout the city, these five stand out as among the top places to visit if you want to experience not just a single museum but also the history and significance of art and culture in Paris.

Louvre Museum

First things first: the Louvre. Perhaps the top art museum in Paris and indeed the world, the Louvre houses a huge collection of works of art, including paintings, sculptures, and more. Some of the most famous pieces include the Venus de Milo and the iconic Great Sphinx of Tanis. The museum also features a wide variety of works from different eras, styles, and cultures. The Louvre, which opened in 1793, is perhaps the most famous of all Parisian museums, and it’s also the largest. It sits on the banks of the Seine River and is full of wide open spaces, so it can be a bit overwhelming. To help you navigate and make the most of your visit, check out the Louvre’s many special exhibitions, including the most famous works of art in the world.

Orsay Museum

This museum houses a collection of impressionist and post-impressionist art, including works by Van Gogh, Manet, Monet, and Cezanne. The Orsay was originally a railway station that was converted into a museum in the 1970s. The museum’s main focus is on French art from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century. This period is often referred to as the “golden age” of French art. The museum’s collection is displayed in the same way it would have been during the height of its significance, and the building itself is a work of art, both inside and out. The Orsay Museum is one of the smaller art museums in Paris, making it a good choice for visitors who don’t have a lot of time. Many people also prefer the Orsay over the Louvre mainly due to the fact that the Orsay is not as crowded as its famous counterpart.


Marmendin Museum

The Marmendin Museum is housed in an 18th-century mansion in one of Paris’s most exclusive neighborhoods. The museum’s focus is on art from the Renaissance period, as well as art from the Middle Ages. The museum is home to a wide variety of paintings, sculptures, and other pieces. Although the museum has a focus on art from the 15th century, it also features art from later periods. The name of the museum comes from the family that once owned the building. The museum also has a special exhibition dedicated to famous French artists such as Henri Matisse, Edgar Degas, Pierre Bonnard, and others.


Museum of the Orangery

The Museum of the Orangery is one of the lesser-known art museums in Paris. This museum attracts a lot of visitors not just because of the fascinating art it houses but also because of its beautiful setting. The museum is located inside the Grand Orangerie, which was built in the 19th century as a greenhouse for orchids. Today, the space is home to a wide variety of art pieces, including paintings, sculptures, and decorative items. The museum focuses on European art from the 14th to the early 20th century. It also houses a collection of Asian art from the 16th to the 19th century.


National Museum of Luxembourg

The National Museum of Luxembourg is a lesser-known art museum that’s worth visiting if you’re interested in the history of art and culture. This museum is home to more than 18,000 art pieces, including paintings, sculptures, and decorative items dating back to the 16th century. The museum’s collection features not just art created in France but also art from other countries, such as Germany, Italy, and Spain. The National Museum of Luxembourg is located inside the Hotel de Voguel, which was built in the 18th century and served as the country’s residence until the 20th century.


Parisian students of Art History offer the best guided tours around Art

No matter what your interests are, there’s absolutely an art museum in Paris that’s perfect for your need.

Whether you’re interested in the classics or modern art, visiting a museum is a great way to explore the culture of Paris.

When visiting the art museums of Paris, keep in mind that most are open from 9 am to 6 pm. From the Louvre to the Marmendin, visiting one of the top art museums in Paris is an essential part of any journey.


Do you want to learn about the basics of art?

Then look no further than our Guided tour with a quality tour guide to learn about the basics of Art in Paris museum. Enjoy a Guided tour with a quality tour guide to learn about the basics of Art in Paris museum. This guided tour will take you to two of the most famous museums in Paris, the Louvre and the d'Orsay. You will learn about two different types of art, Realism and Impressionism. After the tour you will have the opportunity to enjoy a typical French lunch in a brasserie.


Paris is known for having high quality tour guides. This is the place to enjoy a walk with an expert in Art and a guided tour is a great way to learn about the basics of art with an encouraging friendly expert, while also taking in the beautiful sights of Paris.


It is possible to meet a tour guide in Paris at 9.am at the Louvre Museum to learn about Realism and classicism of Da Vinci and his counterparts. Go to the department of paintings and get stunned by the rare paintings of David, Ingres, and the one painting of Caravaggio. An absolute pleasure for the eyes, and the stories behind each painting are a pleasure for the ears.


Then you can go to D'Orsay Museum at 11.am to learn about Impressionism.

To stay chronologically coherent, Impressionism in museum of D'Orsay is the best option after a Louvre tour. As a matter of fact, the Louvre is right next to d'Orsay museum. These two museums are the ranked globally as the best museums in the World.


What is impressionism? Why you should see some paintings of Monet ?

Impressionism was a movement in the late 19th century, characterized by lighter colours and brush strokes, an interest in changing weather, focus on everyday life, and realistic rather than idealized depictions of people. It was a reaction to the artificiality and pretentiousness of Romantic art. The term Impressionism was first applied to art in 1874, when a group of French artists exhibited their works with that word in the title. It has come to be accepted as a general term, though there were active artists in France who rejected the movement and its term.


1.pm : we go to lunch in a typical brasserie of Paris with your guide.

Having a typical lunch in a Parisian brasserie is a must. We can order classic meals or unique local meals such as crepes, escargots, croque monsieur, macarons with truffles.

With your guide, you will enjoy your meals while having an open discussion about History of France, history of Art and the unique meals of Paris.

Your wonderful guide will show you the ropes of eating in a typical brasserie in Paris and you will remember this experience as the highlight of the trip.

We can try one of the stereotypical restaurants in Paris, with stunning views of the Gardens or the River Seine, or Notre Dame or the Louvre depending on our appetite and our energy levels.

We prefer a relaxed atmosphere so we can have a nice talk.

We can eat like the true Parisians : a French salad, or a French cheese and mushrooms omelette. Parisians eat pasta, pizza, steak and eggs and fries. At last, a "coffee gourmand", a crème brulé, crepes with ice cream, as a delicious tonic, sweet and savoury desert.


Enjoy a walk in Paris and see monuments and gardens around D'Orsay.

We can customize the tour and add or remove a stop.


For example, you can ask a guide to add Le Musée du Quai Branly is a museum dedicated to indigenous art from Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. There are unique works on display from all over the world in this museum.


The guide can end the tour around 4.pm or take you to a bar for Apéro and taste some fruity wines, and few typical pieces of cheese.


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